Never buy an IoT product that depends upon the Cloud to work…

So Google bought Nest and then a couple of days ago killed off one of Nest’s home automation products, Revolv, which was sold with a Lifetime Subscription. Actually, they didn’t directly kill the product but will no longer provide the servers essential to its operation after May 2016 – effectively turning it into a brick.

Lesson learned – never purchase any product that depends upon the Cloud for its operation.

Wes Miller discusses this on his getwired.com blog:

What did I learn from Nest ?

” …
As I look back at Nest, it helps me frame the logic I’ll personally use when considering future IoT purchases. Ideally from now on, I’d like to consider instead:
1.Buying devices with open APIs or open firmware. If the APIs or firmware of Nest were opened up, the devices could have had alternative apps built against them by the open-source community (to generally poor, but possible, effect). This is about as likely to happen now as Nest sharing their windfall with early adopters like myself.
2.Buying devices with standards-based I/O (Bluetooth 4.0, Wi-Fi) and apps that can work without a Web point of contact. While a thermostat is a unique device that does clamor for a display, I think that most devices on the IoT should really have a limited, if any, display and rely on Web or smart phone apps over Wi-Fi or BT 4.0 in order to be configurable. Much like point 1, this would mean some way out if the company shutters its Web API.
3.Buying devices from larger companies. Most of the major thermostat manufacturers are making smarter thermostats now, although aesthetically, most are still crap.
4.Buying “dumb” alternatives. A minimalist programmable or simple non-programmable thermostat again.

In short, it’ll probably be a while before I spend money – especially premium money – on another IoT device.

… “

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